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Item ID Site Name Identification Church name Dedication Functional Type Church type Coordinates, ITM system Location Geographical region Provincial affiliation Bishopric Topographical location Distance from nearest bishop-seat Distance from nearest settlement Distance from Roman roads Surveyed site Surveyors Excavated site Excavators History Bibliograpy State of preservation/which parts were uncovered Photos Figures Atrium Narthex Façade and entries Lateral walls Nave Aisles External Walls (for a concentric church) Central space Ambulatory Transept Nave Transept Aisles Transept Ends Bema, chancel screen and apse Lateral spaces Crypt Small finds Small finds photos Small finds figures Comments, discussion and summary Orientation Materials applied (walls) Materials applied (roofing) Atrium Water cistern Narthex Aisles Colonnades / Arcades Number of nave columns in a row Number of aisle columns in a row Number of inner space columns Number of ambulatory columns Capital types Transept Nave Transept Ends Transept Aisles East end Church Head/Chevet Central Apse Category Bema type Bema type text Elevation of Bema above nave Altar remains Altar type Secondary table/s Ciborium Ambo Ambo remains Ambo description Ambo location Ambo materials Ambo placement Apse elevation Apse shape Synthronon Synthronon remains Synthronon location Synthronon description Pastophoria loci Description and function of northern Description and function of southern Image Figures Location Northern apse description and function Southern apse description and function Photos (Lateral apses) Figures (lateral apses) Accesibility and description Function Photos Figures Photos Figures Cult of relics loci Reliquiaries: shapes and contents Photos Figures Photos Figures Burials loci Photos (burial loci) Figures Photos (burial illust) Figures Photos Figures Loci Font structure External shape Internal shape Ben-Pechat type Photos Figures Upper galleries Galleries description Photos Figures Secondary basilica Secondary basilica description Prothesis chapel / Diakonikon Prothesis chapel / Diakonikon description Baptistery Baptistery description Burial room or chapel Burial room or chapel description Sacristy / skeuophylakion Sacristy / skeuophylakion description Martyrs chapel Martyrs chapel description Discussion and Comments
87 Ḥorvat Midras Church Parochial Free standing basilica
194.06
618.28
Village/Town Shephelah Palaestina I Eleutheropolis At the middle of Judean Shefelah. Ca. six km. north – east of Eleuteropolis (Beit Govrin). yes yes
A. Ganor, A. Klein ανδ R. Avner
August–December 2010 and January 2011
,, ,, ,,

Τhe first basilical church, oriented northwest-southeast and built of local limestones, was built over a burial cave with three burial troughs reached via a rock-hewn staircase. The floors of the basilica were of white mosaics. The exact plan of the basilica is not clear. Seemingly the underlying burial cavewas connected to it. 

In the 2nd building phase a large three aisled basilica was built using architectural members and decorative elements of the previous edifice, preserving of its orientation. An atrium and a narthex were attached on the west. The entrances to the complex were located in the western wall of atrium. On the east the church had a central apse (segmental, less than a hemisphere), flanked by dead-ends aisles. Behind the apse two L-shaped pastophoria separated from each other by a wall were located within the straight eastern wall. Two colonnades of four columns separated the nave from the aisles. They were of imported gray marble. The floors were covered with mosaic floors. During Stage 4a the mosaics of the apse and of the bema were laid of tesserae smaller than those of the domus. During Stage 4b (our Phase 2), mosaic floors of the domus were kept and reused, but the southern pastophorium was paved with marble slabs, underlining its special importance (probably, a reliquary was kept there). The shape of the northern pastophorium was also transfered: an apse was installed in its southern edge (its spring cource cornize still preserved). The burial cave, which was reached from the northern aisle via the northern pastophorium and served as a martyrium, was covered with slabs. New white mosaic was laid in this room and it was also decorated with frescoes.  During the same Phase 4b the bema was extended to the west, it was paved with marble slabs and two stairs were installed on its western edge. 

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/3%20-%20H.%20Midras%2C%20Aerial.jpg https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/2%20-%20H.%20Midras%2C%20Plan%202.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/5963-5.jpg

Partially excavated. It was 9 m wide and paved with stone slabs. The main doorways leading to the complex were located in the western wall of atrium.

Exonarthex (opened towards the atrium), was 2.8 m wide and 12.5 m long. It was paved with white mosaic floor.

Three doorways were leading from narthex to the nave and aisles. 

The nave was 10.6 m long (east – west) and 5.3 m wide (north – south). It was separated from the aisles by two rows of four columns each, made of imported grey marble.

The width of the southern aisle was 2.7 m and its length 14 m. The northern aisle was wider.

In Phase I the apse and the bema were paved with mosaic floors.

In Phase II the chancel was extended to the west and two steps were installed. It was covered with marble plates set on top of the earlier mosaic floor. The chancel was separated from the nave by a marble chancel screen. Probably in this phase a marble ambo was constructed at the north – western corner of the bema. Two openings at the northern and southern sides of the chancel screen lead to the aisles. Also to this phase belongs the apse framed in three walls.

Two L-shaped rooms were flanking the apse, reachable via doorways set in the eastern walls of the aisles. The southern room was paved with marble slabs. The two rooms were separated by a wall that was built behind the apse . The floor level of the northern room, paved with white mosaics, was lower than the floor level of the northern aisle. In Phase 2 its southern wall was shaped as an apse roofed by a half-dome the cornize of which was preserved. The walls of the small apse were covered with painted plaster. In this phase (Stages 4b or  5), a new passageway was constructed for direct access into the martyrium from the outside (not from the northern aisle as before).

yes Facing east Limestone tiles, timber Yes

Exonarthex (opened towards the atrium), was 2.8 m wide and 12.5 m long. It was paved with white mosaic floor.

The width of the southern aisle was 2.7 m and its length 14 m. The northern aisle was wider.

Colonnade
Total: 
8
Extant in S: 
4
Extant in N: 
4
Corinthian yes yes Internal apse monoapsidal flanked by "martyrion" on n, and "diakonikon" on s [a la Syria] (mon-aps VI) apsidal U shaped with two lateral openings 2 steps up Yes N Marble Flash with the bema Hemispherical No N & S The northern roomת L-shaped, extending behind the apse (like the opposite southern room), being separated by a wall behind the apse. The floor level of the northern room was lower than the floor level of the northern aisle. It was paved with white mosaic. In a later stage its southern wall got a small apse covered with painted plaster. A stair case in the floor of the apse was leading down to a burial cave (discovered empty), which probably was the reason for the building of the church. Hence this pastophorium was labeled "martyrium" by the excavators. During Phase II a plastered semi-dome with a spring cornice was constructed, being also oriented towards the south. It topped the entrance to the tomb (that was covered with stone slabs), next to the southern wall of the northern room. The doorway between this room and the northern aisle was blocked and a new doorway (0.7 m wide) was opened to the outside in the northern wall of the northern room. The southern room, L-shaped as well, was paved with marble slabs. A staircase in the floor of the small apse of the northern pastophorium was leading down to a burial cave (discovered empty), which probably was the reason for building the church on that spot. It was closed with slabs during the Stage 4b. https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/s-midras-fig.8-l1070432.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/s-midras-fig.6-.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/s-midras-fig.5-l1070214.jpg In the crypt that preceded the church. Three burial troughs, found empty, were uncovered there. The cave did not served as a burial place for the church, but rather as a martyrion. During Phase II a plastered semi-circular installation was built over the entrance to the tomb in the northern lateral room (that was covered with stone slabs), next to the southern wall of the northern room. The excavators suggested a possibility that this installation was actually a baptistery.
92 Tiberias Mt. Berenice "Anchor"; St. George Monastic Basilical
250.83
742.43
Urban Sea of Galilee Palaestina II Tiberias The church is located on the eastern hill of Mount Berenice which is located 0.6 km west of the shore of the Sea of Galilee Tiberias is a bishop-seat Built inside the wall of ancient tiberias Tiberias sits on a roman road surrounding the Sea of Galilee yes yes
Yizhar Hirschfeld
1990-1994
,, ,, ,, ,, ,,

The entire complex, composed of an atrium, narthex, prayer hall and northern wing, was uncovered. The exterior of the building remained, but the interior was altered in later periods.

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/Tib.jpg https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/Untitled.png, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/Tiberias%2C%20Mt.%20Berenice%2C%20Plan%20of%20all%20strata%2C%20Hirschfeld%2C%202004%2C%20f.7.4%28RED%29.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/Tiberias%2C%20Mt.%20Berenice%2C%20Proposed%20plan%20of%206th%20century%2C%20Hirschfeld%2C%202004%2C%20f.7.5.png, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/Tiberias%2C%20Mt.%20Berenice%2C%20Reconstruction%2C%20Hirschfeld%2C%202004%2C%20f.7.79%28red%29_0.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/bereniki_01_-_final_red.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/bereniki_01_-_open_-_final.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/bereniki_03_-_final_red.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/bereniki_04_-_final.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/bereniki_05_-_fina_redl.jpg

The entrance to the complex was through the south wall of the atrium. The atrium is almost square in shape (17X19.5 m); its north-west corner is affected by the city wall. The atrium floor was paved with a mosaic of concentric white circles on a black background with a frame of a running pattern of acanthus leaves, separated from the central pattern by a dark band. Remains of pilasters were uncovered parallel to the three exterior walls of the atrium. The distance between the pilasters and walls might indicate the existence of a portico. In the center of the atrium was a large, 7.5 square meters, 4.1 meter deep and 220 cubic meters, water cistern. The ceiling of the cistern was supported by four pairs of arches that rested upon engaged pillars in the cistern wall, and columns placed in the center of the cistern. The cistern collected rain water from two drainage channels, one from the south-east corner of the cistern and a second from the south-west, which runs from a settling pool located outside the atrium. In addition two drainage channels were uncovered from the north; one runs from a settling pool adjacent to the north wall of the atrium, the second runs from outside the atrium and reaches a settling pool adjacent the northern wall of the cistern .

West of the atrium there is remains of a narthex (3.9 meter wide), most of which is covered by later remains. The narthex leads to the prayer hall and in addition there is an entrance way that allows direct entrance to the northern wing of the structure. In the northeastern corner of the narthex a section of a colorful mosaic, consisting of a geometric interlocking design with floral decoration.

The entranceways are set in the western wall: a wide main entrance with two narrow secondary entrances to the aisles; the main entrance is 1.8 wide, the northern entrance is 1.1 m and the southern entrance was altered in later periods.

The prayer hall is rectangular and has a basilical plan. The northern wall was preserved to 3 m above the floor, it is 0.8 m thick and is coated with 2 cm thick layer of white plaster. the are two entrances along the wall leading to the eastern wing. The southern wall was preserved to 3 m above floor level. This wall is thicker in width, 1.1 m, due to the fact that the southern side of the hill on which the church stands is steeper than the other sides.

The nave floor is leveled with the slight rise of the Bema. The original floor was not preserved, but evidence of the original opus sectile fllor were uncovered. In a probe done under the later floor, a section of a floor with tile impression was found.

The isles were seperated from the Nave by rows of 7 columns which were reused in a later period. The floor of the isles was paved with a mosaic.

The main Apse is hemispherical in shape, with a diameter of 5.8 m, and is built flash with the Bema. the Bema protrudes into the nave at a higher step than the nave. The altar of the first phase was not found, but under the floor a large basalt anchor stone was found. The location of the stone attests to its function as a holy object. built into the apse is a graded Synthronon made of two steps , the bottom one is smaller than the upper.

On the north and south of the Main apse are two smaller hemispherical apses with a diameter of 3.1 m.

yes
Category: 
Other
Description: 
A small piece of fresco was found under the floor of the third phase. The fresco depicts a face of a man. the fresco is dated by style to the 11th centuer C.E.
,
Description: 
The pottery found at the church consists of pottery from the Roman period till the Mamluk period.
,
Category: 
Coins
Description: 
Seventy six coins were found during the excavation. The coins reflect the occupation of the site from the Byzantine to the Mamluk period.
,
Category: 
Glass
Description: 
Large quantities of glass remain were found, with the chronological rang of Late-Roman to the medieval periods. The majority of the vessels are from the Byzantine and Umayyad periods.
,
Category: 
Metal objects
Description: 
A large assemblage of metal finds, which some may have been associated with church life: a lamp hanger, a bell, tools to clean oil lamps and keys.
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Category: 
Other
Description: 
A gray-black hematite amulet dated to the 2nd-3rd century; Two clay loops; pieces of ostrich egg shell that may have been part of the church furnishing; two spindle whorls .
Facing east Basalt tiles Yes Yes

West of the atrium there is remains of a narthex (3.9 meter wide), most of which is covered by later remains. The narthex leads to the prayer hall and in addition there is an entrance way that allows direct entrance to the northern wing of the structure. In the northeastern corner of the narthex a section of a colorful mosaic, consisting of a geometric interlocking design with floral decoration.

The isles were seperated from the Nave by rows of 7 columns which were reused in a later period. The floor of the isles was paved with a mosaic.

Colonnade
Total: 
7
Extant in S: 
7
Extant in N: 
7
Corinthian yes yes External apses, round tri-apsidal apsidal U shaped with two lateral openings 1 step up imprints Stone, table-like No Flash with the bema Hemispherical Yes grades Against the apse Two steps were built in the central apse, the bottom one is smaller than the upper. N & S small hemispherical apses with a diameter of 3.1 m. small hemispherical apses with a diameter of 3.1 m. under altar Under the altar a large basalt stone shaped like an anchor, was found in situ. The stone, smooth on all sides but one, is 1.1m. long, 0.35m. thick, and about 0.55m. high. It weighs about 484 kg. and has a bi-conical hole cat through. A tomb containing monolithic sarcophagus was found in the northeastern corner of the middle room of the western wing. Other an additional wing was built north of the church. the wing is divided into three rooms. the western room had an entrance from the narthex. the middle room (which was larger than the other two) and the eastern room had entrances to the north aisle, and an entrance between the two rooms. A tomb containing monolithic sarcophagus was found in the northeastern corner of the middle room. A lintel decorated with a cross was discovered next to the entrance between the middle and eastern room.
107 Sussita Southwest Church (SWC) Theodorus of Amasia Parochial Free standing basilica
262.25
742.66
Urban Golan Heights Palaestina II Susita On the western slopes of the Golan heights Inside the city of Hippos (Susita) yes yes
Segal and Eisenberg
2010's
,,

Only the eastern third of the church was excavated. The western part partially reconstructed on basis of the walls that are visible on the surface.

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/sussita_burnt_church_zpe_214-2020.jpg https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/1%20-%20Susita%2C%20SWC%2C%20Plan%201.jpg

On the basis of the remains of the walls visible on the surface, the church had a narrow narthex and an atrium.

Three entrances symmetrically ranged on the western wall of the church.

The church (13 m x 9. 50 m) is divided by two rows of columns, three in each row, into a nave 5 m. wide and two aisles, each 2.50 m. wide.

In the center of the eastern wall there is a semicircular apse that is 4 m. wide and has a diameter of 2.40 m. Its good preservation makes it possible to reconstruct the half dome of which the two first layers still remain in situ. The half dome was also built of stones and not by a mould casting. The level of the bema was about 0.40 m. higher than the nave, bordered by three low walls built of ashlars. At least on the western wall parts of a chancel screen were preserved. In the center of the bema, at a distance of 2 m. from the chancel screens, a reliquary was found fixed into the mosaic floor.

In the lateral wall to the north of the apse an opening was discovered. This opening (about 1.50 m. wide), roofed by a lintel made of basalt. The area to the east of the doorway still unexcavated so it is not clear whether the opening leads outside the church or perhaps to a room or hall extending north of the apse.

yes
Category: 
Pottery
Description: 
The pottery found in the burnt layers above the mosaic floor of the nave dated to the end of the Byzantine period. Also, many fragments of roof tiles were found scattered in numerous quantities within the ‎perimeter of the building. ‎
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Category: 
Metal objects
Description: 
Nails of various sizes were also discovered here, and indicate once more that the roof was constructed of wood.
Facing east Limestone, Basalt tiles, timber
Total: 
3
Ionic yes yes External apse, round dead end aisles (mon-aps III) apsidal U shaped without lateral openings 1 step up foundations No Flash with the bema Hemispherical No under altar In the center of the bema, at a distance of 2 m. from the chancel screens, a reliquary was found fixed into the mosaic floor. The reliquary, of three compartments, was made of soft limestone of orange-red color. It had a rectangular shape and measured 0.40 x 0.50 m. It protruded about 0.20 m. above the mosaic floor of the apse.
108 Sussita Schuler 2013: 241; 2019, had suggested that the church and the structures surrounding it from all sides constituted an urban monastery. It this case the church will become also a monastic church, but this proposal deserves further consideration. Northeast Church (NEC) Memorial Basilica with two annexed chapels
262.11
742.80
Urban Golan Heights Palaestina II Susita On the western slopes of the Golan heights Inside the city of Hippos (Susita) yes yes ,, ,, ,,

The entire church, including the narthex and side annexes was excavated. It was built over an earlier Roman peristyle house. Some of its walls were incorporated in the church (Schuler 2019).

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/2%20-%20Susita%2C%20NEC%2C%20Aerial_0.jpg https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/3%20-%20Susita%2C%20NEC%2C%20Plan%202.jpg

The church has no atrium. Access to the church was directly from Cardo 2 North, through an exonarthex.

Instead of a narthex there was the so called “western portico” - an exonarthex, located at the end of cardo 2 North. In the western part of the portico there is a stylobate (18 m from north to south and 0.9 – 1.1 m wide) built of basalt stones. Six column bases are preserved on the stylobate (out of probably eight), with average intercolumnation of 1.96 m.

Two entrances from the “western portico” / exonarthex led into the church. The central, to the nave and the southern, to the southern aisle. An additional entrance, 0.98 m wide,  led through a corridor to the southeastern annexed chamber ("skeuophylakion"). The gable of the facade was decorated by a basalt cross found in debris at the western end of the southern aisle (Schuler 2013, Fig. 316). 

Preserved to several courses. Two doorways in the northern wall connected the aisle with the northern annex. The eastern of the two  led to the "skeuophylakion"; the western one - to the western hall of this annex. A single doorway in the southern wall led to the "diakonikon".  

The basilica is nearly square (12.5 m. X 13 m.) with central nave and two aisles. In the nave two leyers of mosaic floors were recognized. The lower one was more elaborate, with geometrical patterns and animal and floral motifs. The upper mosaic is much simpler, with only few geometric patterns. 

Between the nave and the south aisle there is a row of four column bases set on a stylobate. The intercolumnation averages 2.1 m. Stone benches were installed north to the entrance to the south aisle and along part of its southern wall. The northern aisle is deliniated by a stylobate with six columns, with irregular intercolumnations, making the church asymmetrical. A stone bench was installed along the northern wall. A stone cistern-head is located in northwestern corner of the aisle. It is a piece of of a basalt aqueduct pipe. The southern aisle had a 0.9 m wide door from the west; the northern aisle had no entrance from thhis side. (For doorways in the lateral walls of both aisles, see above, ubder "Lateral walls").

The apse was 4.5 m. wide and 3 m. deep, with remains of plastered synthronon with limestone. The semi-dome above the apse was decorated with frescos. The chancel ran N-S along the entire width of the church, with chancel screen running in a straight line across the nave and aisles in a north – south direction. There was only a single passage in its middle. Two burials were discovered in the bema, within the chancel screen. One, masonry built in its depth, under the floor,  off its center, slightly to the north of the E-W axis, held a stone sarcophagus laid over a decomposed wooden coffin. The other, in its southern end, was a stone sarcophagus projecting slightly above the floor. 

The southern part of the bema was detached from it by two perpendicular walls that enclosing the southern sarcophagus. A narrow passage was left near its north-eastern corner. 

yes Facing east Basalt tiles, timber No

Instead of a narthex there was the so called “western portico” - an exonarthex, located at the end of cardo 2 North. In the western part of the portico there is a stylobate (18 m from north to south and 0.9 – 1.1 m wide) built of basalt stones. Six column bases are preserved on the stylobate (out of probably eight), with average intercolumnation of 1.96 m.

Between the nave and the south aisle there is a row of four column bases set on a stylobate. The intercolumnation averages 2.1 m. Stone benches were installed north to the entrance to the south aisle and along part of its southern wall. The northern aisle is deliniated by a stylobate with six columns, with irregular intercolumnations, making the church asymmetrical. A stone bench was installed along the northern wall. A stone cistern-head is located in northwestern corner of the aisle. It is a piece of of a basalt aqueduct pipe. The southern aisle had a 0.9 m wide door from the west; the northern aisle had no entrance from thhis side. (For doorways in the lateral walls of both aisles, see above, ubder "Lateral walls").

Total: 
4
Extant in S: 
4
Extant in N: 
5
yes yes External apse, round dead end aisles (mon-aps III) apsidal Transversal 1 step up no remains No Flash with the bema Hemispherical Yes grades Against the apse elsewhere At the center of the chancel floor at the east end of the northern aisle is a loculus for ‎a reliquary (31 X 31 X 17 cm). At the central section of the chancel, at its middle, on ‎east – west axis of the church, there is another loculus for a reliquary (17 X 26 cm) ‎and just to its south another one of similar size, made of marble slabs. ‎ Two burials were uncovered within the chancel screen, both installed in Phase 1. One, masonry built under the floor off its ‎central axis, just to its north. The other is a ‎sarcophagus, partially projecting above floor level on its southern end. ‎It was set on the original floor level of the bema. The masonry built burial is 97 cm. wide ‎‎(north – south), 2.17 m. long (east – west), and 1.42 m. deep. It is built of basalt ashlars and covered by stone slabs. Between the second and the third covering slab (counting ‎from the west), a lead pipe extends down into the tomb. Inside the tomb there is a ‎limestone sarcophagus, measures 200 X 60 cm with an internal depth of 30 – 34 cm. ‎It was covered by six stone plates. The led pipe reached a tiny drilled hole in the second covering plate. It held at least nine adult individuals. Remains of three more individuals were found outside. Altogether they include at least three males, three females and a baby. All were disarticulated. A decomposed wooden coffin recognized by iron nails and the different earth hue was uncovered underneath. ‎ The sarcophagus against the southern wall of the chancel, of limestone ‎as well, is 61.5 – 64 cm ‎wide, 2 m long and 35 – 38 cm deep. It was covered by a monolithic stone lid the sides of which were reveted in 3 cm thick marble decorated with crosses. The lid, 2.27 x 0.76 m, has an anointing hole in it shaped like a bowl ca. 10 cm. in diameter, with a rim. It stands on the plaster floor of ‎Phase 1 church, and slightly protruded above the stone slabs floor of the Phase 2.‎ It held the collected bones of a single elderly woman in her 60's plus. The skeleton was found disarticulated, with the limb bones arranged around the skull under the anointing hole. She might have been the founder of the church. https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/sarcophagus_of_the_elderly_woman._schuler_2019.jpg https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/diakonikongeneral_view._schuler_2019.jpg Simple rectangular room A doorway in the southern wall of the southern aisle, near the chancel screen, ‎leads to a spacious room (6.23 x 5.63 m), attached to the southeastern corner ‎of the church. Two pilasters attached to its southern and northern ‎walls carried two arches that held the roof. Stone benches were installed along its northern, western and southern walls. On the ‎south wall above the bench is a rectangular niche in the wall that served as a cupboard. The floor is of hard plaster.‎ A finely worked, square stone cistern-head is located neat the northeastern corner of the. room, set over a platform about 25 cm high above the floor. On the cistern platform a small hoard of ‎gold jewelry, including a magic amulet pendant and three belt pieces, was uncovered under a fragment of a jar. ‎ The over-sized dimensions of this room in comparison to the small size of the church , ‎the cistern, the healing charm and the direct proximity to the tomb of the elderly woman (located in the southern ‎part of the chancel), lead the excavators to suggest that "the room served a local ‎healing cult".‎ Simple rectangular room This is the easternmost room of the northern annex. Mosaic paved, it has three doorways in its eastern, southern and western wall. The eastern door (1.1 m wide), lockable from inside, leads outside, to cardo 3N and to the "peristyle house" to its east. The southern - to the chancel, and the western - to the "median chamber" of the northern annex, that served as a sort of an antechamber both to the "skeuophylakion" and to a non-excavated building that extended farther north (the Northern Building). The multiplicity of doorways and the absence of cupboards cast doubt on the identification of the small (3.43 m north to south ‎and 3.15 m east to west), mosaic-paved room as a treasury (skeuophylakion). In the northeast corner of the ‎room is a bench (62 X 132 X 55 cm high) that was built in Phase 2 over the mosaic floor - the best preserved in the entire church. The western hall of the northern annex, stone paved and accessed through a doorway in the western portico / exonarthex, was actually a corridor that led to the "median chamber". A stone staircase installed next to its southern room led to an upper platform above its eastern end, that was supported by three (or four) columns. It seems that this balcony gave access to the second floor of the Northern Building.
109 Sussita Northwest Church (NWC) Parochial Basilica with two annexed chapels
262.05
742.73
Urban Golan Heights Palaestina II Sussita In the city center, above the cella and the temenos of an Early Roman temple (Augustan or Tiberian), that was N-S oriented. Inside the city of Hippos (Sussita) yes
G. Schumacher
1888
yes
Burdajewicz M. and Młynarczyk J.
2000-2009
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The entire church was excavated, including the atrium and the attached chapels. The Nave and aisles as well as the attached northern chapel were mosaic paved.

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/3%20-%20Susita%2C%20NWC%2C%20Aerial.jpg https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/1_-_susita_nwc_plan_1.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/2_-_susita_nwc_plan_2.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/mlynarczyk_2008.jpg

Square atrium (22 X 22 m.) with a square courtyard (13.70x13.70 m.) surrounded by porticos 3–3.20 m. wide.

The eastern portico served as a narthex.

Three entries led to the basilica. The central - 2 m. wide; the laterals – 1.15 m. wide each.

6.90 m. wide.  Two rows of 6 basalt columns with Byzantine style Ionic capitals separated the nave from the aisles.

3.50 m. wide each.

In Phase 1 the bema and its chance screen were U shaped (4.7x6.15m). In Phase 2 it was converted to a T-shaped chancel with three openings. 

The apse, internal, was 5.60 m. wide and 3.40 m. deep. The synthronon within the apse consisted of three benches of limestone blocks (four at the southern end). Seemingly it was installed in Phase 2 (contra the excavators' opinion in their 2013: 200 report. In an earlier report they expressed a different opinion, like the one presented here). No traces were preserved to indicate the exact location of the altar . 

According to the excavators, in Phase 1 the apse was flanked by two open pastophria. A short cupboard niche for a was installed in the upper part of the southern wall of the northern pastophorium, next to a low doorway that communicated with the main apse. A higher cupboard was installed in the northern wall of the southern pastophorium. 

In Phase 2, an apse was replacing the northern pastophorion. It was shifted somewhat west, leaving a small and narrow space (2.5 m. east – west, 3.50 – 3.70 m. north – south) behind. The low opening still connected this space with the apse. But now the access was via  a narrow vertical shaft left in the synthronon (installed in this phase against the main apse), in which a ladder or another climbing installation seems to have been installed. The excavators suggested correctly that this rear room was a treasury – skeuophylakion.

A marble table (mensa) was placed in front of the northern apse, with a three-compartment reliquary placed on it, serving the cult of relics. Free access to the reliquiarium was barred by extending the chancel screen of the bema accross the northern aisle, thus forming a separate chapel. 

The southern pastophorium was mosaic paved. Unlike the excavators, this space seems to have been lockable in its original state. In Phase 2 the western, closing wall was replaced by a wide arch. A patch recognized in the mosaic floor under the arch is a clear evidence to the existance of this wall. A reliquary was set in the mosaic floor under a four-legs secondary table (mensa) (see more under Cult of Relics section in the Detailed Description tab). This lockable space thus became a martyrion of a Syrian-Apamean type, open to the southern aisle by a wide arch. This was a second locale for the cult of relics. Free access to the mensa and the underlying reliquary was barred by extending the chancel screen of the bema accross the southern aisle, thus forming a second separate chapel.   

yes Facing east Basalt tiles, timber Yes

The eastern portico served as a narthex.

3.50 m. wide each.

Total: 
6
Ionic yes yes Internal apse second apse on the n apsidal T shaped with three openings In Phase 1 the bema was U-shaped. In Phase 2 it was converted to T-shaped. no remains No Flash with the bema Hemispherical Yes grades Against the apse The synthronon within the apse, installed in Phase 2, consisted of three benches ‎of limestone blocks (four at the southern end).‎ N & S Unlike the excavators, it is maintained here that in Phase 1 it was a lockable room connected to the central apse via a low doorway. A short cupboard was installed above and to the left of the lintel of this doorway. In Phase 2 the western wall was dismantled, being replaced by a small apse, leaving a small space behind (2.5 m. east – west, 3.50 – 3.70 m. north – south). The doorway led now to a shaft left in the thickness of the synthronon. This was the only mean to access the rear space which the excavators correctly identify as a treasury – skeuophylakion. Unlike the excavators, it is maintained here that in Phase 1 it was a lockable space. Its western wall was dismantled and replaced by a arch, open to the southern aisle. The existence of the earlier wall is suggested by a patch in the mosaic floor exactly under this arch. The walls of the room were plastered and painted in different colors with undetermined patterns. A large reliquary (0.56 X 0.45 m.) made of pink limestone was placed in the mosaic floor under a mensa. The reliquary is dated to the end of the 6th – early 7th century CE. N A small apse replaced in Phase 2 the earlier pastophorium. A marble mensa was placed in front and a reliquary three compartments was set over it. Free access to the reliquary was barred by extending the chancel screen of the bema across the northern aisle. N apse, elsewhere Altogether, three, perhaps four reliquaries were uncovered. The one in the northern apse, of marble, was seemingly set on top of a secondary table (paratrapezon / mensa), since it left no traces on the mosaic floor. It had three narrow rectangular compartments. A miniature glass bottle with tiny pieces of bone was found in the middle compartment. A large reliquary (0.56 X 0.45 m.) made of pink limestone was inserted into the mosaic floor of the southern lateral room (martyrion), under a mensa. It had three compartments - a circular one flanked by two rectangular. Each had its own lid. Above was set a second reliquary, of marble, with a gabled lid, similar to the one in the northern apse. A bronze rod was set in a hole drilled in the center of its lid. The fourth reliquary(?) was uncovered in the "diakonikon", annexed to the basilica on the south (see below) Outside the basilica. See below under Attached Structures. Outside the basilica. See below under Attached Structures. Their existence is attested by the collapse of mosaic floors of an upper floor uncovered in the southern aisle and elsewhere. Stairs attached to the northern wall of the atrium on the outside, seem to lead to the galleries. Quadrangular chapel The southern annex, labeled "diakonikon", consists of two interconnected spaces (the western 4.90 m. long, the eastern 6.80 m. long; both 3.90 m. wide). The western space is spanned by one arch, the eastern - by two. Entrance (1.75 m. wide) was from the southern aisle, on its western part. Together the two rooms look as an elongated chapel. A masonry bed was installed opposite the entrance. Many utensils and vessels of clay and metal were uncovered dispersed on the floors. Among them a broken stone case with two compartments that might have served as another reliquary. The excavators' proposal that it was a small basin for baptizing new-born by sparkling seems to be less plausible. A stone plate broken to two pieces leaning against the eastern wall might had originally served as a table plate, but its original location is not known. The metal vessels include agricultural utensils (sickles, a pruning knife), an Umayyad decanter and a bronze polycandelon ring. The clay vessels include cooking pots, pans and bowls, interpreted as home-made meal offerings. It is evident that in its final phase this hall served as an all-purpose storeroom, not solely for liturgical vessels. Other The excavators suggested that the mosaic paved rectangular room (4.60 m. north – south, 6.60 m. east – west) attached to the basilica on the north served as a baptistry. It was entered from the center of the northern aisle via a 1.15 m. wide door. In Phase III a winery was built above it. The original function of this room is unknown, but it is wider than the southern "diakonikon" and unlike it, it is mosaic paved. To its west there is an elongated hall, labeled "fermentation room". Being mosaic paved as well, and of the same width, these two attached spaces seems to had served as a prothesis chapel. Quadrangular chapel To the west of the "diakonikon" a square room (3x3 m), entered from the southeastern corner of the atrium, held two cist-tombs oriented E-W and covered by basalt beams. A donor named Antona mentioned in a Greek inscription set in the mosaic floor of the southern portico of the atrium might have been buried here. In Phase 3 one of the cist tomb was cleared of its bones and wine jars dated to the 7th c. were placed therein. Simple rectangular room This was not an annexed space, but rather a rear room left behind the southern apse (see General Description).
144 Shavei Zion - South Church South Church Parochial Basilica with an annexed chapel
207.99
765.60
Village/Town Western Galilee Phoenicia I Ptolemais On a sandstone (kurkar) ridge 7 km north of Acre (Ptolemais) Sitting on Roman road, connecting Antioch with Acre (fragment of roman milestone recovered about 300 m east of the church). yes yes
Prausnitz
1955, 57, 60, 63
,, ,,

The entire church was excavated, including atrium and the attached structures.

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/3%20-%20Shavei%20Zion%2C%20Photo%201.jpg https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/1%20-%20Shavei%20Zion%2C%20Plan%201.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/2%20-%20Shavei%20Zion%2C%20Plan%202.jpg

A wide staircase was leading up to the atrium, that was surrounded by porticos. The western gateway was erected south of the center of the atrium, yet opposite and in line with the main door leading into the central nave of the church. The western facade of the enclosing wall of the atrium was at least 30 m. long.

The narthex floor was covered with a mosaic which was dated by an inscription to the 5th century.In Phase I the terraced outer narthex and the continuation towards the north of the narthex formed one large continuous porch which turned and continued in an easterly direction alongside the northern wall of the domus. In Phase II a stylobate with two columns separates between the narthex and the exonarthex. The exonarthex extended much to the north relative to the narthex and the domus. From this extension a corridor led to the east, parallel to the northern wall of the church. The narthex, at its northern end, also had an entrance to this corridor.

A flight of steps lead from the atrium to the church itself, which, together with the northern courtyard and adjacent buildings, were erected on top of the hill. The excavators assumed that the church probably had eleven entrances: three in the western wall (including the main central entrance); six side entrances, symmetrically arranged, in northern and southern walls, three in each wall; and two entrances in the eastern wall, one from each side of the apse.

All walls were built of local sandstone cut into squares and rectangles. The exterior walls were not plastered while the interior walls were coated with painted plaster with geometrical designs. The interior walls were also decorated with inlays of white marble, green granite and red porphyry.

The church domus was divided into a nave and two aisles by two colonnades of five columns each, with Corinthian capitals. The church floor was covered by mosaic carpets. The central and eastern parts of the nave show a number of repairs in the mosaic floor, resulting from modifications in the arrangement of space in front of the bema.

The location of the altar is recognized by imprints in the floor of the bema. In Phase I the bema occupied two inter-colunniations and a solea, flanked by two secondary tables, extended farther west into the nave. In Phase II the chancel, made of marble, was extended to occupy the third inter-colunniations, the two secondary tables, set above crosses, were encompassed by the chancel screen, and a third table, without a cross underneath, was added in the SW corner of the bema, next to its western entrance.

yes Facing east Kurkar tiles, timber Yes No

The narthex floor was covered with a mosaic which was dated by an inscription to the 5th century.In Phase I the terraced outer narthex and the continuation towards the north of the narthex formed one large continuous porch which turned and continued in an easterly direction alongside the northern wall of the domus. In Phase II a stylobate with two columns separates between the narthex and the exonarthex. The exonarthex extended much to the north relative to the narthex and the domus. From this extension a corridor led to the east, parallel to the northern wall of the church. The narthex, at its northern end, also had an entrance to this corridor.

Colonnade
Total: 
5
Corinthian yes yes External apse, round two openings flanking the apse (mon-aps IV) apsidal Phoenician type A solea led from the nave to the bema. 1 step up imprints Marble, table like No Flash with the bema Hemispherical No Simple rectangular room A small rectangular room was attached to the northeast, parallel to the north of the east end of the domus. Two different mosaic floors found super-imposed one upon the other indicated two building phases. In the 2nd, later phase, the chapel was enlarged to measure 5 m. south to north and at least 6 m. west to east. It seems to had served as a martyrs chapel. In Phase 1 four bases were set ‎into the floor of its north-eastern corner, carrying small columns which surrounded a cross.‎ This installation seems to have been an altar table carrying a reliquary. Another possibility is that a reliquary was put underneath.
147 Nahariya Giv'at Katsenelson Ovadiah and de Silva (1981) assertion that the church was dedicated to St. Lazarus is false. It has no basis whatsoever. Parochial Free standing basilica
210.05
768.24
Village/Town Western Galilee Phoenicia I Ptolemais On a hill About 10 km. north to Acre (Ptolemais) On the Roman road connecting Tyre and Acre. yes yes
Dauphin and Edelstein
1972-1974
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Tri-apsidal basilical church with Phoenician type bema with solea, annexes on the north (not excavated; recognized by the plaster floor), south, and to the east of the northern apse. Dimensions: 16.6-17.7 x 28m. (larger in the east than on the west). 

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/1%20-%20Nahariya%2C%20Plan%201.jpg

The western part of the complex was not excavated.

The walls wee built of local kurkar stone and coated with a thick layer of plaster.

Paved with a mosaic floor with geometric, floral and figurative motifs.

Two rows of six marble columns divided between the nave and two aisles. The capitals supported the wooden beams of a gallery above each aisle.

The bema in front of the central apse has a lower bema (chœur bas) and a solea in front, extending into the nave, enclosed by a marble screen. The passage from the lower bema to the solea is flanked by two secondary tables that were supported by three marble legs. The main bema was two stairs higher than the nave; the lateral apses - just one stair. The northern apse was 3m in diameter and 2.1m deep. A large quantity of marble pieces of the altar were found on the bema. The chancel screen consisted of twelve screen panels separated by ten screen posts.A cross was depicted in the mosaic floor of the northern apse. 

Bases of two offertory tables each standing on four columns, were found in the lateral apses.

yes Facing east Kurkar tiles, timber

Two rows of six marble columns divided between the nave and two aisles. The capitals supported the wooden beams of a gallery above each aisle.

Colonnade
Total: 
6
Corinthian yes yes External apses, poligonal tri-apsidal apsidal Phoenician type A solea led from the nave to the lower bema and hence to the wider and higher bema. 2 steps up plate Marble, table like Secondary table/s No Flash with the bema Hemispherical No N & S Cult of relics? (indicated by a table of four legs that stood in the apse). Cult of relics? (indicated by a table of four legs that stood in the apse). N apse, S apse Simple rectangular room A mosaic-paved room to the east of the northern apse might had served as a martyrs chapel.
149 Beth Yerah (Philotheria; Khirbet el-Kerak) Church Parochial Basilica with an annexed chapel
253.79
735.99
Rural Sea of Galilee Palaestina II The site is located at the southwestern tip of the Sea of Galilee, just north of the present mouth of Jordan River. The church is located at the north end of the mound. ca. 8 km south - southeast of Tiberias. ca. 1 km east of the road between Gadara and Tiberias. yes yes ,, ,, ,,

Good preservation of all architectural components, including an atrium, narthex, domus and attached structures.

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/1%20-%20Beth%20Yerah%2C%20Plan%201_0.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/2%20-%20Beth%20Yerah%2C%20Plan%202_0.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/3%20-%20Beth%20Yerah%2C%20Plan%203_0.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/4%20-%20Beth%20Yerah%2C%20Plan%204_0.jpg

The entrance to the atrium is from the south throw a portico, opened towards the atrium. The atrium is a rectangle (10.5 X 21 m.), with its long axis slightly askew from the axis of the domus. The atrium is paved with large white mosaic. In the middle of the atrium is an underground cistern, about 5 m. deep. This cistern collected rain water from the roofs of the porticoes and the domus by a network of drains under atrium floor. In the southeast corner of the atrium a remains of a staircase were found, which, probably, led to an upper floor. The open southeast portico of the atrium was connected in its southeast corner with the corridor, which runs along the southern wall of the domus.

The narthex has been added when the domus was already built. The western wall of the narthex originally had a wide opening towards the atrium that was narrowed later on. In the eastern wall of the narthex were three entrances to the domus. There was another doorway in the northern wall of the narthex, leading to the unit of two rooms, attached to the northwest corner of the domus. The narthex was paved with a mosaic with geometric pattern.

In the eastern wall of the narthex were three entrances to the domus. The central was wider and led to the nave. The lateral doors led to the aisles.

The domus is basilican in plan (11.50 m. wide and 12.50 m. long), with a central nave and two aisles ending at the east with three horseshoe-shaped apses. The nave was divided from the aisles by two rows of five basalt column bases (seven bases found insitu). The columns were plastered. The nave and the aisles had a poorly preserved mosaic floors.

In the central apse remains of a synthronon preserved, represented by a stone bench of 1 m. wide attached to the inner wall of the apse. The synthronon was two tiers high (about 60 cm.) and, probably, covered with marble. The bema was U-shaped and a little narrower than the central apse. It was raised about 20 cm. above the nave floor level. Later on, during the Phase III, the bema became T-shaped, expanding towards the eastern parts of the aisles.

During the Phase II of the church, lateral apses have been added to the aisles.

yes Facing east Limestone tiles, timber Yes Yes

The narthex has been added when the domus was already built. The western wall of the narthex originally had a wide opening towards the atrium that was narrowed later on. In the eastern wall of the narthex were three entrances to the domus. There was another doorway in the northern wall of the narthex, leading to the unit of two rooms, attached to the northwest corner of the domus. The narthex was paved with a mosaic with geometric pattern.

Total: 
5
yes yes External apses, round tri-apsidal apsidal T shaped with three openings The bema of phases 1-2 was U-shaped and a little narrower than the central apse. It was raised about 20 cm. above the nave floor level. The chancel screen didn’t preserved. A box-like depression (29.5 cm. square and 14 cm. deep) for a reliquary was found on the center line of the apse and at its chord. The reliquary may represent the place of the altar, which is not preserved. In phase 3 the bema became T-shaped, expanding towards the eastern parts of the aisles. 1 step up Flash with the bema Yes grades Against the apse In the central apse remains of a synthronon preserved, represented by a stone bench of 1 m. wide attached to the inner wall of the apse. The synthronon was two tiers high (about 60 cm.) and, probably, covered with marble. N & S Cult of the relics: in the center of the northern apse, in the floor, a box-like depression (35 cm. square and 20 cm. deep) for a reliquary was found. under altar, N apse In the central apse a box-like depression (29.5 cm. square and 14 cm. deep) for a reliquary was found on the center line of the apse and at its chord. In the floor, in the center of the northern apse, a box-like depression (35 cm. square and 20 cm. deep) for a reliquary was found. Two stone built tombs were found under the floor of the domus, belong to Phase I. One tomb located near the western end of the north aisle, while the other one located in the western part of the nave. The first tomb (1.93 m. X 76 cm. X 72 cm.) contained remains of several skeletons and few small finds, while the second (1.90 m. X 42 cm. X 25 cm.) was empty. The northeast baptismal chapel approached by a doorway in the eastern half of the northern wall of the north aisle. Apsidal chapel The northeast baptismal chapel approached by a doorway in the eastern half of the northern wall of the north aisle. This unit consists of two rooms: the square antechamber and a rectangular inner room (5.20 X 6.80 m.). The baptismal font moved to this room, first, probably to the circular plastered basin (80 cm. diameter) in its center and later on, to the mushroom-shaped basin (a semicircle 93 cm. in diameter, with added rectangle of 45 X 48 cm.), located at the apse of the room.
155 Jerusalem (Greater Jerusalem) According to Christian tradition, the church is located in place where pregnant Mary was sitting to rest before reaching Bethlehem. CATHISMA; KATHISMA Mary Theotokos Memorial Octagonal
220.26
627.40
Para-urban Jerusalem (Greater Jerusalem) Palaestina I Jerusalem On plain ground overlooking the Judean Desert, next to the road leading from Jerusalem to Bethlehem. 4 km distant from Jerusalem. 4 km south of the Old City of Jerusalem. Next to the road, to its east. yes yes
Avner R.
1990's
,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,,

The octagonal church was entirely excavated.

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/1%20-%20Kathisma%2C%20General%20Plan.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/2%20-%20Kathisma%2C%20Plans%20by%20Phases.jpg

A natural rock protruded above floor level In the center of the church. The rock was surrounded by an inner octagon, forming the central space of the church.

The inner octagon was surrounded, in turn, by an octagonal ambulatory, being separated from the inner octagon by eight free standing corner pillasters and columns in between. The ambulatory was surrounded by an external octagonal unit, divided into rooms and chapels.

In the northern, southern and western sides of the external octagon were located rectangular entrance rooms. In the diagonal sides of this unit four chapels were located. Each chapel comprised of a rectangular room and an apse, generally oriented to the east. Each chapel had two doorways: one leading from the ambulatory and the other - in the wall against the apse, to an irregular shaped room. These rooms were located in the corners of the outer octagon, connecting between the side chapels and the rectangular entrance-rooms of the church.

In the eastern part of the external octagon were located the bema and the external apse. In Phase II the bema was extended to the west, into the ambulatorium. The extension was made by adding of two parallel walls with two staircases between them that led to the bema.

yes Facing east Limestone No No yes yes External apse, poligonal apsidal U shaped without lateral openings In Phase II the bema was extended to the west, into the ambulatory. The extension was made by adding two parallel walls with two staircases between them that led to the bema. 2 steps up Flash with the bema Horse-shoe shape
447 Jerusalem (Mount of Olives) Memorial church at a place of agony of Christ. It commemorates the prayer of Christ in Gethsemane (Matt. 26: 36-56; Mark 14: 32-52; Luke 22: 39-54; John 18: 1-12; Origen, Comm. ad Matt., PG 13, 1740; Eus. On. 74.16; Hier. ad loc. 75.19; Egeria, It. 36; Eutychius, Annales 1. 215). In 2020 an Early Christian chapel (yet unpublished as of Aug.9, 2021) was excavated to the west of the present church by IAA. The references of Jerome and Eutychius (who attributes its construction to Theodosius I), may refer to this early chapel, since tri-apsidal churches started to be built only since the mid 5th c. No cave came to light in these excavations. Gethsemane (Church of Agony) Memorial Free standing basilica
222.82
631.84
Para-urban Jerusalem Mount of Olives Palaestina I Jerusalem Mount of Olives yes yes
Greek Church
1891
,
Frs. L. Thonessen, B, Meistermann
1909
,
A. Barluzzi
1919-20
,
1958
,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,,

A tri-apsidal church (25.5x16.35) with a central salient apse. Mosaic paved. Three tombs were oncovered in the northern internal apse. Only the foundations were uncovered, partly overlaid by the Crusaders church. Its remains can be seen at the present Church of All Nations. 

https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/getsemane_area_map_corbo_1965.jpg, https://dig.corps-cmhl.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/illustrative_material/1%20-%20Gethsemane%2C%20Plan%201_0.jpg

The atrium to the west of the church was poorly preserved. It appears that the atrium was surrounded by porticoes and annexed rooms and had a rectangular water cistern beneath the floor. Five tombs were discovered under the floor of the atrium.

Extended to the west; partially exposed. A water cistern underneath. 

The church’s façade was poorly preserved. It is unclear whether the church had only one entrance or it was flanked by two lateral doorways.

The thickness of the walls was 0.6 – 0.7 m and they were covered with painted plaster. The foundations of the eastern part of the church were hewn into the rock.

The church (23.30 X 15.16 m; internal dimensions) was divided by two rows of seven columns to a nave (7.82 m) and two aisles (3.67 m each). The columns (0.51m in their lower diameter), of pink limestone, stood on square bases decorated with crosses and bore Corinthian capitals also with cross in their abacus.

Each 3.67m wide.

The central apse (4.2 m deep; 7 m chord) was salient; the two flanking apses, semi-rounded as well, were internal (1.4 m deep; 2.8 m chord). In the area of the apse and the bema an isolated block of rock projected 0.35 m above the floor level of the nave marking the rock of Agony in the local tradition. The bema, U-shaped, was protruding two intercolumniations into the nave. 

Three Byzantine tombs were discovered in the northern apse.

yes Facing east Limestone Yes Yes

Extended to the west; partially exposed. A water cistern underneath. 

Each 3.67m wide.

Total: 
7
Corinthian yes yes External apse, round tri-apsidal (central external, lateral internal) apsidal U shaped without lateral openings In the area of the apse and the bema an isolated block of rock projected 0.35 m above the floor level of the nave. This rock probably corresponds to the Christian tradition as the very spot where the Agony took place. Flash with the bema Hemispherical N & S Three Byzantine tombs were discovered in the northern lateral apse. Cult of the relics? N apse Three Byzantine tombs were discovered in the northern lateral apse. Five more tombs were discovered under the floor of the atrium.